Author Topic: How to Show Line Numbers In Studio  (Read 174 times)

MrLeadFoot

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How to Show Line Numbers In Studio
« on: August 23, 2019, 03:56:08 pm »
Whenever scripts contains an errors are run, an error message is displayed which often presents the line number in the code, yet I can't figure out how to display line numbers in Studio. Can someone please share how to do that? Thanks.

jmburton2001

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Re: How to Show Line Numbers In Studio
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2019, 08:38:26 am »
I always look here.

MrLeadFoot

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Re: How to Show Line Numbers In Studio
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2019, 01:00:15 pm »
OK, so no line numbering feature (which is odd since all code environments I've seen, even web design software, has line numbering), but at least there's a workaround.  ;)

Thank you so much for the reply.

td

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Re: How to Show Line Numbers In Studio
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2019, 08:47:15 am »
I usually type the ctrl+g key combination and enter the line number into the "Go to line" dialog and press return.
"No one who sees a peregrine falcon fly can ever forget the beauty and thrill of that flight."
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MrLeadFoot

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Re: How to Show Line Numbers In Studio
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2019, 08:54:23 am »
I usually type the ctrl+g key combination and enter the line number into the "Go to line" dialog and press return.
Good idea. Thank you, Td.

pguild

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Re: How to Show Line Numbers In Studio
« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2019, 07:30:51 pm »
I wish Winbatch would add the feature of automatically jumping to the offending line number.  :)
I included that feature in a little utility I created around 1988 for creating assembly language executables.
It's funny how a little thing like that can reduce the friction and make compiling and fixing errors almost enjoyable.

The utility I created actually invoked the assembler program and then captured the output. It grabbed the line number from the error message, and then opened the editor and jumped to that line number.  A full function editor was included with the platform I was used to create the utility.

It was easy because I was using Turbo Prolog at the time, which had some built-in features that made that easy.
(PROLOG = Programming in Logic).